Multicultural Mythoversal Thebes

For thousands of years, classical mythology has described this mythical-era kingdom as a multicultural melting pot.

Becoming Hercules is set in Mythoversal Thebes. For thousands of years, classical mythology has described this mythical-era kingdom as a multicultural melting pot, starting from its founding by Cadmus, a prince from the Levant, and his new bride, Harmonia, who met and married Cadmus during his visit to her native island of Samothrace.

With the death of Laius, the last king in the Cadmeian Dynasty, the monarchy fell to Oedipus, an adventurer who fled his homeland of Corinth after receiving an ominous prophecy. His queen was Iocaste, who descended from the dragon-blooded Spartoi.

Among the residents of Thebes were the Mainads, whose ancestors followed the wine god, Dionysos, from the Vedic lands far to the east. The Theban army was managed by General Amphytrion, who arrived as an exile from Mycenae. Amphitryon and his wife both traced their roots to Ethiopian royalty.

But diverse as it might be, Mythoversal Thebes is no utopia. There are still tensions, inequalities, and injustices. The society is a patriarchy to the extreme. A caste of residents are enslaved. And sometimes, a sphynx perches at the city gate and kills everyone who tries to enter.

Each resident of Mythoversal Thebes must decide for themself how to navigate the challenges particular to their homeland, just like people still must do in the modern world. I’m enjoying the challenge of setting a story in Mythoversal Thebes, and I hope you will enjoy reading it.

By Greg R. Fishbone

Greg R. Fishbone is an author of disrupted mythology including the young adult serial BECOMING HERCULES. He is also the founder of Mythoversal, a project dedicated to broadening representation in classical tales by amplifying historically marginalized identities and restoring traditions erased by centuries of gatekeeping.